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Posts Tagged ‘transformation’

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Words and Photo by Katie Kuykendall

In a dimly lit church, this young Senegalese man studies his Bible intently by the light of a single window. The members of this congregation speak Creole, Manjak, and the national language – French. Though French is not the language most of them know best, many only have access to French Bibles and glean what they can from the text despite their limited understanding.

One Manjak pastor said, “Sometimes people don’t understand the Bible in French. Sometimes we read it in Creole [in church], and only some understand. But when we read it in Manjak, everybody understands.”

Another Senegalese man said, “God’s Word is something of greatness, and it’s for all.”

As a team translates Scripture into Manjak, it’s already transforming hearts. Watch the story of one man whose life changed as a result of the Gospel in his language.

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New translation in Panama represents ongoing work to provide Scriptures in every language

Representatives from Wycliffe Bible Translators USA recently presented a complete Bible in the Kuna language to Dr. Paul Nyquist, president of Moody Global Ministries.

Forrest Zander, a 1954 Moody Aviation alumnus and longtime Wycliffe missionary pilot, along with Tim Born, Wycliffe’s senior director of strategic partnerships, gave the gift in recognition of a 2009 Moody Radio campaign that raised half a million dollars from listeners to fund Bible translation projects in Panama and Peru.

Wycliffe representatives Tom Born (left) and Forrest Zander (middle) present Moody president Dr. Paul Nyquist (right) with a Kuna Bible.

Wycliffe representatives Tim Born (left) and Forrest Zander (middle)
present Moody president Dr. Paul Nyquist (right) with a Kuna Bible.

“We are honored to be part of this effort to equip the Kuna people of Panama with the entire Bible in their language,” said Dr. Nyquist. “This translation project is at the heart of Moody’s mission to equip people with the truth of God’s Word across the globe, cultures and generations. We will pray that those who receive the Scripture in their mother tongue will come to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ and that believers will be equipped to grow and share the truth with others.”

This story was originally posted at Moody Global Ministries. Click here to read the full article.

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We are thrilled and honored that Wycliffe USA’s film, “Arop: Sacrifice, Tragedy, Transformation” placed third at the International Christian Film Festival last weekend! The documentary chronicles how God used a devastating tsunami to change the face of Bible translation in Papua New Guinea.

On July 17, 1998, three massive tidal waves struck the northern coast of Papua New Guinea, killing more than 2,000 people and destroying Arop and other coastal villages in a matter of seconds.

“Arop” is based on the book “Sleeping Coconuts,” the true account of Wycliffe translators John and Bonnie Nystrom, who had lived among the Arop people for 10 years before the tsunami hit. In the aftermath, the Nystroms and the Arop translation team members saw an opportunity to transform their approach to Bible translation. The new method involved local translators from 11 language groups working together on simultaneous projects.

“We don’t have enough translators like us to go around,” Bonnie explains in the film. “God is raising up local people to do translations in multiple languages so the expertise that we can bring can be multiplied.”

The full 30-minute film is available at www.wycliffe.org/arop. There you’ll also find an opportunity to receive related discussion questions for your family or small group.

3rd place Best Documentary award

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“We would like to find the [Dâw] tribe. Where are these [Dâw]?” missionary Valtier Martins said when he first arrived in the Amazonas town of São Gabriel, Brazil.

He was answered with a laugh.

“Ok, the first person you find there in the street, fallen down, drunk—that’s a [Dâw],” was the reply.

Valtier finally located the Dâw and began living among them, teaching God’s Word. Several of them were wary of the foreigner. They had long been exploited by the plantation owners they worked for, and they assumed the missionary would do the same.

But this outsider was different. He and nearly a dozen others taught them God’s Word over the course of many years.

“Everything began getting better little by little because we were listening to the Word of God,” deacon Célio Dâw said. “And God kept giving us more and more strength.”

Click here to watch a video in which Célio and three other Dâw men tell their stories of how God spoke to them, drawing them out of despair and drunkenness to spiritual leadership. Today, the Dâw have grown from sixty to one hundred and twenty people who are respected in their community.

Hope

 

 

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We often underestimate the power of prayer to change the world around us. But as the examples in this video show, our prayers can help change people’s lives in significant ways. And just by praying, you can help people get a Bible translation in their language.

Visit wycliffe.org/prayer to learn how you can start impacting lives through prayer today!

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In the late 1980s, John and Bonnie Nystrom came alongside several men from Arop village in Papua New Guinea to translate the Bible into the local language. But a decade later, a massive tsunami took the lives of many in Arop village, including one of the translators.

Wycliffe Bible Translators is proud to present this short film about the Nystrom family and the sacrifice, teamwork and faith of the Aitape West Translation Project team in the face of tragedy. We encourage you to set aside an evening to watch it with your family, or share it with your church and other members of your community. Grab a cup of coffee or some popcorn and enjoy this film together! And don’t forget to download the accompanying discussion questions so your group can further engage with the Arop story.

Visit wycliffe.org/arop for more information about the film and translation project.

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By Melissa Chesnut

Fernando* was only ten years old when his father shared an idea with the translation team working in the Zapotec language in his town. At the time, his father’s idea seemed far-fetched and almost impossible.

He told the team that Fernando would be a good person to help translate Scripture for the Zapotec people once he finished school.

It wasn’t good timing though. Fernando still had almost eight years of schooling to complete before he would be able to potentially join the team. For the translators, that seemed a long way off.

But God had other plans. During the years following Fernando’s father’s idea, the translation work was paused for various reasons.

By the time the team was once again ready to resume the translation project, Fernando was done with school. He was also looking for work. When the translators learned the Fernando had completed his schooling and was looking for a job, they offered him a role on the team. Fernando gladly accepted.

Fernando2Working as a Bible translator is not just a job to provide income for his family; Fernando has wholeheartedly taken on this full-time role, while also fulfilling an obligatory role in his town of supervising the community store. Fernando is certainly busy between the translation work, supervising the store, and spending time with his wife and young baby, but he is an invaluable contribution to the team! He also encourages the local church to listen to the audio form of Luke, which was recently produced and released in his heart language.

Although it once seemed impossible that a young boy would grow up to work as a translator for his people group, God orchestrated events in such a way that Fernando’s father was right. Fernando would be a good person to help translate the Scripture and bring God’s Word to his people in the language of their heart.

*A pseudonym.

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